Sputnik Sweetheart: Of mirror worlds and split souls

To my companion in all things Murakami (and many others),

You are a storyteller yourself. So tell me,have you ever just picked up your pen and written down something, seemingly normal,  and begun to realize its depths only much later?

A little under two years ago, I penned down a story called ‘The boy and the mirror’. It was written within an hour, reflected some of the very conventional romantic turmoil in my life at that moment and it was a concept that just flowed, without much thought being attached to it. It is fascinating how much your own mind can conceal from you. I see that story now in ways I hadn’t even thought about earlier.

Sputnik Sweetheart refuses to leave my brain, and this is, in particular, because of one specific incident that ties in to these other thoughts. One of the women, Miu, is trapped in a Ferris Wheel at night, and she happens to have a pair of binoculars. With nothing much to do except wait, she trains her binoculars on her bedroom window visible in the distance. And then she sees herself inside her bedroom. I won’t give you details lest it ruin the book for you. But to cut a long story short, it is as if her consciousness is split into two. She is in two places at the same time, if you know what I mean. And no, it isn’t a time-turner story.

Which brings me to, Horcruxes. I know it isn’t quite the same idea. But I have always wondered if there are other ways to create horcruxes, accidentally perhaps. Is it only murder that can tear one’s soul? Perhaps love can as well. This is a good question to research- does love in facts rip the soul, and if so, is the rupture permanent or temporary? But that is for another time.  (By the way, it is interesting how Riddle’s diary would have had fifty percent of his soul, and it was created with the murder that is perhaps the most justifiable out of all that he committed- that of the man who abandoned his mother.)

Moving on from that detour into Harry Potter,  I don’t know if you’ve felt this way- torn, between parts of yourself. I have, on occasion. It is interesting because of late, I have been reading some bits of spiritual philosophy that are focused on considering oneself whole, as an integrated being. You aren’t torn, or split, or divided, it claims- it is a construct of your mind. Well, of course, it is. But I do need to live with my mind. I cannot arrive at a certain destination in my mind-map before it is time.Perhaps the process can be accelerated, but honestly, I have a feeling that conflict leads to the best stories.

So coming back to you, the storyteller, would you keep the peace or the stories?

Watch

Watch your mother gaze at the ridges and bumps

On your sunshine-stained face, wondering where

she’s gone wrong in sculpting her personal

Mona Lisa. Watch your father hit ‘Love’ on your

social media profile, only to lean close to you and

whisper, “You need to get your skin fixed.” Watch

those hassled parlour attendants voice a question

that is certain to drench you in a little pool of your

melting insecurities. “Why don’t you take care

of yourself?” Watch those cucumbers on your eyes;

Watch for an entire calendar year the brownies on

someone else’s plate. Watch the scars as they jeer

at exotic creams advertised in between your mother’s

favourite daily soap- Watch the women in those same

daily soaps jeer and shame each other. Wash your face

with soap, for the fifteenth time. Watch your face

in the mirror. Remember the time you spent watching

a slideshow of old pictures of yourself. Watch that serving

of forbidden food in front of you, lest you relive the pictures.

Watch yourself, trying so hard to hide your scars. Watch me,

trying to tell you that if the Grand Canyon were unblemished

land, no one would give it a second thought. Watch yourself-

You, as magnificent as a rain-clad horizon. Don’t watch at

the window for acceptance that comes only with clear skies.

For just a moment, watch with love, and watch

your favourite constellations shine

With your light.

 

Real

The world is full of real problems. I am reminded of this every morning when I step out to go to work and I see a stray dog flinch just because a human walked too close. I sit in a taxi with the windows rolled up and earphones plugged in, trying not to look at the naked child on the opposite footpath who is eyeing the apple in my hand. There will always be more naked children than there will be apples.

I sit in a cubicle every day compiling columns of statistics on disease and hunger, reading about how a large fraction of the country’s population does not have food to eat. I tell myself that what I am doing will make a difference to that fraction one day. I ignore the fact that the fraction is made up of a multitude of wholes. For now, I ignore it in favour of staring up at the fraction of the moon as I head home. This time the naked children eye my parcel of over-priced junk food. Sometimes I buy them some too. It makes me feel good about myself.

After I eat, I sometimes have a lot of work to do. But some times I think about problems. Other kinds of problems, unreal ones, you could say. Like the kind of sadness that comes out of a neutral blankness, and reconciling the roles of living for yourself and living with other people. Like trying to figure out what certain words mean to you, and what they mean to others. Like the concept of having your heart broken, and how it is a very inane phrase because the heart is a muscle not a bone.

But then inane things hurt more than sensible ones. They always have. There is clarity when it comes to ‘real’ problems. You either have food or you do not. You either have money or you do not. You are either dead or you are not. (Unless you’re the cat)

You’re either happy or you’re not. But what is happiness?

You’re either in love. Or you are not. But what is love?